Of interest to a nine year old girl was Grandma Bellzona's daily activities. I didn't know then her treadled machine sewed lovely lush colored shirts for the Osage men. She outfitted many young Osage girls in pretty Sunday go-to-meeting dresses.

All this must have given me the fun of being a worker at home as Proverbs last chapter advises.

From 4H on through the grades to high school at Chilocco Indian School, all facets of home economics was just for fun. And what is the point of this story, today June 2020 that devil virus forces all to stay at home. There are no changes in that for me.

Dad left me antique photos. For busy work they are displayed in my museum room along with mother's beautiful sewing of Native American ribbon work. This is all for fun too. Folks coming through enjoy and sign my guestbook. My grandchildren are now passed nine years old; however, they still love the interesting old photos. One visitor who is only six years old of age asked me, "How many of these people are worshipers of Jehovah."

Children today are just as fascinated with adult's work and activities as I was.

Being a grandma like Bellzona wasn't a goal, it just happened. Her mother Elizabeth Ann Brewer Collins read her bible thoroughly, the pages would fall apart to her favorite scriptures. These women left a legacy of strength and values.

Some of George Flyod's last words were to ask for his mother, who is no longer living.

So as women of color black, brown, yellow, or white continue as mother's and grandmother's even through the trouble - why can't we as a people learn from these varied cultures who are tied up in love?