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    Newsletter 1st April 2011

    CONTENTS
    --------
    Electric Scotland News
    Electric Scotland Community
    The Flag in the Wind
    Geikie's Etchings
    Historical Tales of the Wars of Scotland
    Glencreggan: or A Highland Home in Cantire
    Kay's Edinburgh Portraits
    Traditions of Perth
    Glasgow and it's Clubs
    Robert Burns Lives!
    John Clay - A Scottish Farmer
    Berwick upon Tweed
    Old Church Life in Scotland
    Places of Interest about Girvan
    Fishermen and Fishing Ways
    Poems of George Alexander Rodger
    The Complete Scotland
    The Correspondence of an Old Scotch Factor
    The Making of our Mother Tongue
    Beth's Newfangled Family Tree
    Lochs and Glens - March 2011
    The Social Condition of the Poor in Glasgow


    Electric Scotland News
    ----------------------
    Well this week was more about personal time as I'm doing a renovation of my kitchen and about time really. `Realigning shelves so I can reach them better, paint job, new lighting, new handles for the cupboards and a reorganisation of my various appliances to give me more space. Then a new dual flush toilet and a new cupboard to go into the toilet. I'm also mounting a cupboard in the toilet that I found in my basement. It looks like it belongs there so not sure why it was down there but now will have good use.

    -----

    Do keep an eye out for Tartan Day events in your area next week as most areas will have something on. I might add that the Flag in the Wind and myself did a really good presentation for Tartan Day in the USA in 2001 which you can read and listen to at http://www.scotsindependent.org/features/tartan_day.htm


    ABOUT THE STORIES
    -----------------
    Some of the stories in here are just parts of a larger story so do check out the site for the full versions. You can always find the link in our "What's New" section in our site menu and at http://www.electricscotland.com/rss/whatsnew.php


    Electric Scotland Community
    ---------------------------
    Lots of new topics started this week and if you click on "New Posts" after you've read this newsletter you can see what we've been discussing.

    Our community can be viewed at http://www.electricscotland.org/forum.php but of course if you are reading this you're already in it :-)


    THE FLAG IN THE WIND
    --------------------
    This weeks issue is now available Compiled by Jim Lynch in which he is in election mode giving us updates on the fight for the next election in around 5 weeks time.

    You can get to the Flag at http://www.scotsindependent.org


    Geikie's Etchings
    -----------------
    This week we've added more etchings...

    It's Very True, Mony Up's and Down's I've Seen
    It's Our Meal Hour The Now
    Temptin' The Bairn



    And these now complete this book which I hope you have enjoyed.

    You can read these at http://www.electricscotland.com/hist...ikie/index.htm


    Historical Tales of the Wars of Scotland
    ----------------------------------------
    And of the Border Raids, Forays and Conflicts by John Parker Lawson (1839). This is a new publication we're starting on which is in 3 volumes. We intend to post up 2 or 3 stories each week until complete.

    This week we've added...

    A Legend Of Strathearn
    Feuds between Montgomeries and Cunninghams - 1588
    The Earl Of Glencairn's Expedition to the Highlands - 1653-4

    You can read these accounts at http://www.electricscotland.com/history/wars/


    Glencreggan: or A Highland Home in Cantire
    ------------------------------------------
    By Cuthbert Bede (1861)

    This week we're on Volume 2 with...

    Chapter XXVIII - Killean - A Scotch Kirk and Sabath


    A romantic and unexpected Road. — Fisherman's Wife. — Detached Rocks. — Their Beauty and Geology. — Legends anent them. — Vitrified Fort. — A botanical Witness to Man. — Nature's Testimony to human Vices. — Needs follow the Steps of Man. — The Shore. —
    Killean Free Chui-ch. — The Village. — Killean Church. — A faithfull Minister. — St. liillian. — The Presbyterian Service. — Liberty of Conscience. — Hymnology and Singing — Objections to Organs - Sir Walter Scott's Opinion. — Presbyterian "Simplicity." — Reality and acting. — Scotch Liturgy. — Standing in Prayer. — Ancient Customs. — The revival Movement in Cantire. — A Gaelic open-air Service. — Its Characteristics. — The Covenanters.

    You can read this at http://www.electricscotland.com/history/glencreggan/


    Kay's Edinburgh Portraits
    -------------------------
    A Series of Anecdotal Biographies chiefly of Scotchmen, Mostly by James Paterson and Edited by James Maidment (1885)

    This week we have added...

    Colquhoun Grant, Esq., Writer to the Signet
    George Mealmaker, Author of the "Moral and Political Catechism of Man"
    Lord Meadowbank, of the Court of Session
    The Right Hon. the Earl of Moira, Commander-in-Chief of the Forces in Scotland
    The Formation of Lothian Road

    Quite an interesting wee account on the Formnation of Lothian Road and here is the complete account...

    This road, which leaves the western termination of Princes Street at a right angle, and stretches away to the south, had been long projected ; but, owing to the objections made (as is usual in such cases) by the proprietors of certain inestimable barns, sheds, and cow-houses, which required to be removed, a long time elapsed before the plan could be brought to maturity. After several years of speculation, and when the project was nearly conceded to by all parties, the road was, to the surprise of the public, and the mortification of many, completely formed, without leave being asked, all in one day! It so happened that a gentleman, who had recently succeeded to his estate, laid a bet with a friend, to the effect that he would, between sunrise and sunset, execute the line of road, extending nearly a mile in length, and about twenty paces in breadth. This scheme he concerted with address, and executed with promptitude. It was winter, when many labouring men are often out of employ; so that he found no difficulty in collecting several hundreds at the spot upon the appointed morning before sunrise; and he took care to provide them with a plentiful supply of porter, usquebaugh, bread and cheese, and other inspiriting matters. No sooner had the sun peeped over the hills, than this immense posse fell to work, with might and main.

    Some to tear down enclosures, others to improof and demolish cottages, and a considerable proportion to bring earth, wherewith to fill up the natural hollow to the required height. The inhabitants, dismayed at so fast a force, and so summary a mode of procedure, made no resistance; and so active were the workmen, that, before sunset, the road was sufficiently formed to allow the bettor to drive his carriage triumphantly over it, which he did amidst the acclamations of a great multitude of persons, who flocked from the town to witness the issue of this extraordinary undertaking. Among the instances of temporary distress known to have been occasioned to the inhabitants, the most laughable was that of a poor simple woman, who had a cottage and a small cow-feeding establishment upon the spot. It appears that this good creature had risen very early, as usual, milked her cows—smoked her pipe—taken her ordinary matinal meal of tea—and, lastly, recollecting that she had some friends invited to dine with her upon sheep-head kail about noon, placed the pot upon the fire, in order that it might simmer peaceably till she should return from the town where she had to supply a numerous set of customers with the produce of her dairy. Our readers may imagine the consternation of this poor woman, when, upon her return from the duties of the morning, she found neither house, nor byre, nor cows, nor fire, nor pipe, nor pot, nor anything that was hers, upon the spot where she had left them a few hours before—all had vanished, like the palace of Aladdin, leaving "no wreck behind." [The gentleman, we believe, who performed this undertaking was Sir John Clerk, Bart., of Pennicuik. He succeeded his father in 1784, and was then an officer in the navy. He died in 1798.]

    The other entries can be read at http://www.electricscotland.com/history/kays/index.htm


    Traditions of Perth
    -------------------
    Containing Sketches of the Manners and Customs of the Inhabitants during the last century by George Penny (1836)

    We've now added Pages 261 to 272 and included in these pages are accounts of Shipping and Bridgend.

    You can get to these pages at the foot of the page at http://www.electricscotland.com/history/perth/


    Glasgow and it's Clubs
    ----------------------
    Or Glimpses of Conditions, Manners, Characters and Oddities of the City By John Strang LL.D. (1857)

    This week we've added...

    Progress of Liberal Opinion in Glasgow—Sma' Weft Club
    Glasgow Politics in 1832—Crow Club
    Concluding Sketches of Past and Present Clubs
    Appendix

    These now complete this book.

    You can read these chapters at http://www.electricscotland.com/hist...w/clubsndx.htm


    Robert Burns Lives!
    -------------------
    By Frank Shaw

    Remember Tam O'Shanter's Mare, A Study of Burns and Health, by Sir Kenneth Calman

    For me, one of the highlights of the recent Burns and Beyond conference hosted by the University of Glasgow’s Centre for Robert Burns Studies was a speech given by Sir Kenneth Calman, the university’s chancellor. Sir Kenneth’s speech was entitled “Remember Tam o’ Shanter’s Mare: A Study of Burns and Health.” I did not know what to expect from a chancellor speaking about Burns, but I was certainly not disappointed – he knows his Burns! A word about Sir Kenneth:

    Sir Kenneth Charles Calman (1941- ) was elected Chancellor of the University in 2006. He is a graduate who was appointed to the Cancer Research Chair of Oncology in 1974 and became Professor and Dean of Postgraduate Medical Education in 1984. He was awarded an honorary DSc in 1996.

    Calman graduated from the University BSc, MB ChB, PhD and MD and lectured in Surgery before his appointment to the Cancer Research Chair in 1974. In 1989 he was appointed Chief Medical Officer at the Scottish Office Home and Health Department. He was Chief Medical Officer at the Department of Health in London from 1989 to 1991 and worked in the Department of Education and Science and its successors from 1991 until his appointment as Vice-Chancellor and Warden at the University of Durham in 1998. He was awarded a KCB in 1996.

    Sir Kenneth is Chair of the National Trust for Scotland, and he is the main author of The Calman Report on the future of public policy in Scotland which was commissioned by the Scottish Government. The former Chancellor of Durham University, Sir Kenneth is one of the most distinguished British academics in the field of Medicine, particularly cancer studies. He has long been interested in the Medical Humanities and is completing a Masters thesis on Scottish Literature & Medicine. (FRS: 3.30.11)

    You can read his article at http://www.electricscotland.com/fami...s_lives114.htm

    All of the Robert Burns articles can be found at http://www.electricscotland.com/fami...rank/burns.htm


    Old Church Life in Scotland
    ---------------------------
    By Andrew Edgar, Minister at Mauchline (1885).

    We have now got up the main lectures and they contain a lot of very interesting information.

    Lecture I.—Churches, Manses, and Churchyards in Olden Times
    Mauchline Session Records—The Present Church of Mauchline—The Old Church and its Outward Appearance—The Old Church as it was before the Reformation—The Surrounding Monastery— Changes on and in the Church at the Reformation—Few Fixed Seats—Fairs in Churches once—Introduction of Pew System—A Grievance in Connection with the Pew System—The Galleries and Common Loft—The Bell—The Clock—The Windows—Repair of Church Fabrics and Drink to Workmen—Manses of Old Date— Size of Old Manses—Manses Thatched with Straw, and Roughly Finished in many ways—Delivery of Manses by Executors of Former Ministers — Churchyards — Tombstones—Association of Mauchline Churchyard with Burns—Filthy Condition of Churchyards at One Time—Houses on Churchyard Dykes—The Ash Tree in Mauchline Churchyard.

    Lecture II.—Public Worship in Olden Times
    Readers—The Reader's Preliminary Service—Reading the Word—The Reader's Salary—Precentors—Music and Organs in Church— Amount of Psalm Singing — Mode of Singing—Doxologies— Hymns and Paraphrases—Preachers—Read Prayers and Extempore Prayers—The Bidding Prayers of the Ancient Church— Sermons on Sunday—Week-day Lectures and Sermons—Catechising on Sundays and Week-days—Form of Sermons—The Ordinary—Scottish and free Sermons—Silent Sundays—Disorder in Church—Hats on—Candles in Church—Hours of Divine Service.

    Lecture III.—Communion Services in Olden Times
    Preparatory and Accompanying Services on Week-days—Examination of Congregations—Reconciliations—Purging the Roll—The Preparation Sermon on Saturday—The Fast Day—Object of the Fast —Distribution of Tokens — Monday's Thanksgiving Service— Furnishings for the Sacrament — The Tables — Purchasing of Tokens—Communion Cups—Bread and Wine—.Service on Communion Sabbath—Frequency and Infrequency of Celebration— Communion Extended over Several Sabbaths—Communions Early in the Morning—Order of Service—Admission to the Table— Kneeling or Sitting—Assistants at Communion — Communion Crowds—Disorders at Communions—Mauchline Sacrament in Mr. Auld's Day—Number of Communicants and Tables—Month and Day of Communion often Changed.

    Lecture IV.—Church Discipline in Olden Times
    Institution of Kirk Sessions—Calderwood's opinion—A Session in Mauchline soon after Reformation—Constitution of Kirk Sessions —The Moderator—Elders—Their Election and Ordination—Subscription of Confession of Faith—Functions of Kirk Sessions— Discipline—Monk's views and Dr. Hill's statement—Complaints against Sessions for over-rigidness—Sessional inquiries : how instituted—All rumours reported—Libellers and consignations— Special districts for elders—Perambulations—Testimonials—Evidence taken—Oath of Furgation—Session's watchfulness over their own Members—Privy censures—Presbyterial visitations.

    Lecture V.—Church Discipline in Olden Times
    What scandals were investigated by Kirk Sessions—Insolence to, or slander of any member of Session—Disrespect for the rules or ordinances of the Church—Drunkenness —Broils and Bickerings— Theft—Murder—Sabbath breaking—Impurity—Witchcraft—Cursing—Heresy—Schism and Secession—Taking the bond.

    Lecture VI.—Church Discipline in Olden Times
    Censures—Rebukes—Sometimes in private and sometimes before Congregation—Delinquent sometimes stood in his own seat—Sometimes in the public place of Repentance—Sometimes in usual clothing and sometimes in sackcloth—Repeated compearances for rebuke, called a course of repentance—Cautioners for compearance and for subsequent conduct—Bands for good behaviour—Disuse of cutty stool—Excommunication—Corporal and pecuniary punishment— Session Bailies—Joggs—Fines—Warnings—Deference paid to Kirk Sessions—Cases of Disrespect and Disobedience—Aid of Magistrate needed—Insolence to the Session—State of Parochial morality at different dates—Street fight in Mauchline between a merchant and a lawyer, with the Bailie looking on—Village Rowdyism—Poosie Nansie and her hois book as we get it up at usehold—Social Progress— Causes to which progress is due—Grounds of hope for the future.

    You can read these lectures at http://www.electricscotland.com/bible/churchlifendx.htm


    Places of Interest about Girvan
    -------------------------------
    By Rev. R. Lawson (1892).

    We now have up...

    Girvan Town Council Minute Book
    Girvan Street Names
    Some Girvan Notabilia
    Rev. William Corson
    The Rev. P. Hately Waddell, LL.D.
    Rev. Cathcart Kay, Parochial Schoolmaster

    Some quite illuminating wee stories in this book and here is a wee bit from Rev. William Corson to illustrate this...

    MOST people in this district know that Thomas Carlyle in his "Reminiscences" thus alludes to the late minister of Girvan:—"The next farm (Corson's of Nether Craigenputtock), very stupid young brother, now minister in Ayrshire, used to come and bore me at rare intervals." Perhaps it might be interesting to give some of Mr Corson's reminiscences of Mr Carlyle, so that the balance may hang even between them.

    Mr Corson had, of course, a very high estimate of Carlyle. As an instance of his kindliness, he told me that Carlyle had offered to teach him German, and that he was in the habit of laying his disused pipes in a cranny of the dike for any passer-by that was needy. But it was Mrs Carlyle who was his special favourite. She was very pretty, he said, and used to be compared to Mary, Queen of Scots. And when he was about to be licensed as a probationer, she thus good-naturedly gave him her advice:— "Now, William, don't be going about seeking for a church, like the rest of them, but go out to the highways and hedges, and preach away like a house on fire."

    "How did she address her husband?"—"She always called him "Carlyle."—"Did they keep a free table"— "No, I never saw spirits in their house except once, and that was when we had been shovelling away the snow in front of the doorway. She then insisted on each of us taking a dram."—"Were they greatly respected by the people about?"—"She was, and was always called the lady." But the country folks thought he had married her for her money, and looked down on him accordingly. They also blamed him for not shutting the gates on the public road after he passed through them, so they sometimes went the length of jeering him as he rode past, and would shout out for him to hear—"I say Jean, if I had been gaun to buy a man, I wad hae bocht a brawer man than that!' "

    You can read this book as we get it up at http://www.electricscotland.com/hist...rvan/index.htm


    Fishermen and Fishing Ways
    --------------------------
    By Peter F Anson (1932)

    We're making good progress with this book and now have up...

    Chapter I. Prehistoric Fishermen.
    Chapter II. Fishermen of Ancient Egypt, Palestine, Greece, and Rome.
    Chapter III. Folk-lore and Superstitions of Fishermen.
    Chapter IV. Festivals and Blessings of the Sea.
    Chapter V. Fishermen and the Law.
    Chapter VI. Trawl-fishing.
    Chapter VII. Drift-net Fishing.

    You can read this book at http://www.electricscotland.com/loss.../fishermen.htm


    Poems of George Alexander Rodger
    --------------------------------
    Added another two poems, Forneth Braes and The Hoeing Match which you can read at http://www.electricscotland.com/poetry/rodger01.htm


    The Complete Scotland
    ---------------------
    Have at last completed this book which you can read at http://www.electricscotland.com/trav...land/index.htm


    The Correspondence of an Old Scotch Factor
    ------------------------------------------
    By Charles Rampini.

    Came across this account while reading an issue of the Scottish Review. I did a very quick ocr'ing of it onto the site but also added a link to the pdf file. You can get to this at http://www.electricscotland.com/hist...tch_factor.htm


    The Making of our Mother Tongue
    -------------------------------
    By P. Giles, M.A., LL.D.(1906). This is a small book which we've roughly ocr'd in but also made available as a pdf file. Our thanks to John Henderson for finding us this book which you can read at http://www.electricscotland.com/poetry/doric.htm


    Beth's Newfangled Family Tree
    -----------------------------
    The April 2011 issue is now available. Always a great read each month and mind that all the past issues are all available on the site from issue No.1. You can view this issue and reach the archives at http://www.electricscotland.com/bnft


    Lochs and Glens - March 2011
    ----------------------------
    This is an account of a 6 day tour of Scotland, with dinner, bed and breakfast and all for £207 or around $350 or so dollars. Our thanks to Jeanette Lemmon for sending us this account. Some of you may remember that she was Jeanette Simpson before getting married and she did type in quite a few books for us over several years. She was then living in the USA but is now based in England.

    You can read this account at http://www.electricscotland.com/travel/tours/tour35.htm


    The Social Condition of the Poor in Glasgow
    -------------------------------------------
    Two reports for 1889 and 1891. I extracted this account from an old copy of the Scottish Review and it can be read at http://www.electricscotland.com/hist...conditions.htm


    And finally a way to tell between a Church of Scotland Minister and a Free Kirk Minister...

    "Is there anything more to put ashore, Donald?" queried the captain of a steamer at a pier in the West Highlands.

    "Ay, sir," answered Donald, "there's the twa-gallon jar o' whisky for the Established Church minister."

    "For the Established Church minister, Donald?" said the captain laughing. "Are ye quite sure it's no' for the Free Kirk minister?"

    "Quite sure, sir," said Donald cannily.

    "The Free Kirk minister aye gets his whisky-jar sent in the middle o' a barrel o' flooer!"


    And that's it for now and hope you all have a good weekend.

    Alastair
    http://www.electricscotland.com

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  3. #2

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    Re: Newsletter 1st April 2011

    I've registered to correct the offence in the title 'Glasgow and it's clubs'. There should be no apostrophe in 'its'.
    Ghillesag.

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    Re: Newsletter 1st April 2011

    You are quite correct Ghillesag and have corrected that on the site.

    Alastair

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    Re: Newsletter 1st April 2011

    Thank you.

    Ghillesag

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    Re: Newsletter 1st April 2011

    Alastair, you can always say that you're a student of transformational grammar. This postulates that if the receiver understand what you intended. No offense. I have had some problems with punctuation rules as when when written cases like possessive using an apostrope, most listeners would never hear the difference if the sentence was spoken. Besides we're all speaking an alien language anyway.

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    Re: Newsletter 1st April 2011

    Alastair, I certainly enjoyed Jeanette's commentary and pictures on the trip up into Scotland. It's truly good to be able to see the countryside I liked so much years ago. So, thanks again for the newsletter, & the link to their trip. Joan

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    Re: Newsletter 1st April 2011

    Nice of you to say so but have to confess that in this case I should have known better as I do this bit of grammar.

    I was brought up overseas and most of my spelling was American but then I went to boarding school in Scotland where of course it was British spelling. And as this is very much an international site I'm not that concerned about folk using US English or UK English or whatever for that matter.

    Mind you over the years I have had lots of email complaining about my spelling. I would always reply saying that there likely was an error but could they verify the spelling they expected as we had USA English and UK English and for that matter a lot of material in the old Scots language. So if they could clarify I'd be more that happy to make any corrections that were needed.

    Funny thing is that I've yet to get a reply from any of those emails.

    Alastair

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    Re: Newsletter 1st April 2011

    I have noticed that there is a psychological process at work in all of this. I miss typographical errors while scanning my statements before hitting the post button. A day or so later they pop up and laugh at me. Maybe the edit capability could remain in place longer than it is. That way, I could edit out those insolent little typos when they rear their ugly heads a day later.

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