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Thread: Senechal

  1. #1

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    Senechal

    Wondering why "Senechal" is used. It may have been used in parts of Scotland but cannot recall any use of that in Perth.

  2. #2

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    Re: Senechal

    You have not said where the word was used....

    The Perth area would have had several 'Nobel' families, and the word may have been used in that context.

    The following may give some information.

    Also note in the list of forums, Alastair has used the 'word', for the title of the fourth forum !


    Ranald

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seneschal

    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    A seneschal (/ˈsɛnəʃəl/) was an administrative officer in the houses of important nobles in the Middle Ages and Early modern period. In a medieval noble household a seneschal was in charge of domestic arrangements and the administration of servants.[1] In the French administrative system of the Middle Ages, the sÚnÚchal was also a royal officer in charge of justice and control of the administration in southern provinces, equivalent to the northern French bailli. It is equivalent to the Slavonic title stolnik or the English steward.
    Last edited by Ranald; 3rd October 2015 at 11:22.

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  4. #3

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    Re: Senechal

    Ranald:
    I had read that, Ranald, and had noticed the "Senechal" thread/topic and that was the reason for my inquiry, simply do not remember having seen or heard Senechal before reading this site; curious is all.

  5. #4

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    Re: Senechal

    I wonder is the word 'sentry' derived from the original 'senechal' which could almost have been 'keeper' ?

    It is amazing how words spoken by one person, can be changed by being spoken by another of different race or speech dialect.

    Even now in Scotland, a local area dialect is sometimes difficult understand, by someone from another area.

    Much as I like the BBC, many of their reporters present use of the English language grammar leaves a lot to accept.

    The same can be said about the printed press.


    A fascinating subject.

    Ranald

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  7. #5

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    Re: Senechal

    I don't know the word either and I agree with you Ranald. The grammar of today's reporters both spoken and written makes me cringe at times. I particularly don't like it when they use what instead of which. I think it's mostly because of the way they were taught ( or not taught) in school. My 2 youngest siblings in Scotland are both atrocious spellers because of the way they were taught.

    Elda

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  9. #6

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    Re: Senechal

    I have mainly seen the word 'seneschal' (with acute e's) used with reference to officials of the medieval French court. It's possible the word may have come into use, like many other Scottish words, as a result of the 'Auld Alliance'. In the fourteenth century, Robert Semple was described as "Seneschal of Renfrews"; I suppose the modern equivelant would probably be "Ballie".
    - John.

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